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The Complete Package For Career Education - Career HQ
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The Complete Package For Career Education

I believe in people letting the walking do their talking rather than blowing their own trumpet.

However, please forgive me if I do a bit of talking for a few moments as for 7 years we have been walking the journey of building a complete package of career education tools which are easily usable by all students and young adults from year 9 to mid career.

Last week we launched the final component (a How To Find A Job Program) of our CareerHQ package of tools for individuals, schools, tertiary education providers, and job seekers and career changers from 15 to 40 years of age.

 

Our efforts have been motivated by four (4) main objectives

  1. To help students and young adults to more confidently address their No 1. anxiety of what career am I going to pursue and how do I get a job?
  2. To provide young adults from 15 to 40 years of age with a “Compass” and process to guide their career decisions at intervals throughout their working lives.
  3. To support under-resourced career advisers and schools with an integrated package of online tools which can help them provide a lot more support for their students from the limited funds and time they have.
  4. To provide all individuals and organisations with the necessary career education and decision making tools and information from one integrated website as opposed to having to “go fishing” across a range of different websites and sources.

 

The CareerHQ package now assists students, young adults and career advisers in the following ways:

  1. The CareerHQ Compass, which is a 6 module online career exploration tool, helps individuals to understand Who am I; What careers best suit my skills and interests; and Why?
  2. The CareerHQ Occupations Database enables people to understand what various jobs do and require; and their future outlook. The jobs in this database are also psychologically  and behaviorally coded so people can gauge how well suited they are to their jobs they prefer. This is the only database in the world to be as comprehensively coded this way.
  3. The CareerHQ How To Find A Job Program helps individuals to develop the skills, documents and confidence to effectively go about getting the job they want. This 10 module program is available on the CareerHQ website for use by individuals, schools and tertiary education providers.
  4. An online platform that enables career advisers in schools and tertiary education organisations to efficiently and effectively administer personal career education and assistance for large numbers of people.
  5. This platform also enables career advisers and education providers to obtain data on the skills, interests, and preferred jobs and industries of their students. This can provide valuable input for education curricula and policy planning.

 

These tools and applications are also available to parents through our website to help to facilitate meaningful discussions with sons and daughters on the often sensitive subject of “What should I study at school, TAFE or University?”, “What career should I pursue after my studies?” and “How do I go about getting a job?”.

Equally important, these tools are available to individuals, schools, tertiary education providers and parents at very favourable prices. For schools, CareerHQ offers significant concessions as our contribution to better preparing young Australians to go about their careers as fields of opportunity rather than minefields of anxiety and stress. If people are doing jobs that use skills that they are good at, and fit with what they like doing, the mental health and employment benefits are huge.

That’s enough talking, now back to the walking of helping young Australians turn challenge into opportunity.

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